Silly Verse for Kids – a book I wish I had read as a child

I briefly mentioned Spike Milligan’s brilliant book of children’s poetry and songs, Silly Verse for Kids, in this post last week, and decided it deserved a little bit more attention, especially as it is Poetry Month still (also, I just love Spike Milligan).

Written almost half a century ago, this small book contains over thirty rhymes, all with Milligan’s own ridiculous drawings (which feature prominently in his other books too, including his war memoirs), which were written either to amuse his children, or as a result of things they had said at home. The poetry and songs aren’t particularly amazing in terms of poetic technique, but they are funny and are quite clever in terms of content, still retaining enough of a musical quality to make them fun for children (and, let’s be honest, fun for adults too – I’m twenty-five but I still enjoy reading this book).

Some of the rhymes in this book became quite famous and are still sung to children today – in particular, Spike Milligan wrote On The Ning Nang Nong, a song I grew up with, but which I only attributed to Milligan recently. There are a few others that I particularly enjoy, that I thought I’d share for a bit of fun. The first is a cute one about a Granny struggling in adverse weather, the second is making fun of the stereotypical English teeth (which as an English born man with imperfect teeth, I can appreciate), and the last is just plain silly (the third line of which goes off the page in the book…you’ll see what I mean).

Granny

Through every nook and every cranny
The wind blew in on poor old Granny;
Around her knees, into each ear
(And up her nose as well, I fear).

All through the night the wind grew worse,
It nearly made the vicar curse.
The top had fallen off the steeple
Just missing him (and other people).

It blew on man; it blew on beast.
It blew on nun; it blew on priest.
It blew the wig off Auntie Fanny –
But most of all, it blew on Granny!

Teeth

English Teeth, English Teeth!
Shining in the sun
A part of British heritage
Aye, each and every one.

English Teeth, Happy Teeth!
Always having fun
Clamping down on bits of fish
And sausages half done.

English Teeth! Heroes’ Teeth!
Hear them click! and clack!
Let’s sing a song of praise to them –
Three Cheers for the Brown Grey and Black.

Failure

I’m trying to write the longest first line that poetry has ever had,
For a start that wasn’t bad,
Now here comes a longer oneeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
I know I cheated:
It was the only way I could avoid being defeated. 

I know there are many other great books of children’s poetry and song out there, but this is one book that has certainly grown on me, in all its silliness. It makes me want to write similar rhymes for my children, one day, and any book that inspires one towards writing of any kind has to be worth a mention.

Have you read this book before? Who’s your favourite author of children’s rhymes (if you have one)?